Ocytocine

Ocytocine

The isolated tribes are happy people, they make with what they have since their childhood.These peoples are rooted into their seasons, their food supply , they are in accordance with their environment.
In our western societies we became operators on a chain of products, a society that wants to erase our differences so that the whole human group works, to eliminate the nuances between the individuals, the loss of confidence in Diversity.
It is easy to say that if everything has changed, it is the fault of the Foreigner, this other to us. Lack of analysis on oneself.
We are every film directors of our life and we give intentions to the others.
There is a real necessity of reinventing ourselves, of founding this serenity this first people still have.

Paul Ricoeur « the shortest way from ourselves to ourselves, goes through the other »

Patrice Pelissier d.F lives in a small village south of France, Saint Martin de Londres. Idealist, realistic, Patrice still believes the good is possible, if we really want it.

my language

my language

“All these little pieces of paper I have painted are like letters of the alphabet, they are my vocabulary, my language, I am not sure what I am going to do with them” says Parisian artist Olivier GARAND.

In the left entrance of his studio in the 11e district near La Bastille, Olivier collects stones from the African deserts he used to collect while trekking for three weeks in a row in the Sahel regions, “I like the idea of the discovery; just like I discover a new stone in the sand desert untouched for thousands of years, I like the idea of discovering my art pieces as I progress in creating them, as new discovery…. ”

Olivier’s show in Paris is a real success “I think people like colors because people need colors, our world is grey, that’s why I avoid watching the news on TV”. Colorful pieces of paper, collages, drawings, sculptures, Olivier’s world is a rainbow in his eyes.

 

 

The painted writing

The painted writing

“I spent my life writing as much as painting”says Jean Cortot. Friend of famous photographers Man Ray and Henri Cartier-Bresson but also Picasso, Jean invited me for lunch Rue du Bac at the Fontenoy cafe, and when he entered all the customers stopped talking and watched at this elegant old artist. Born in Alexandrie, Jean is a poet as much as a painter and succeeded in making the symbiose between writing and painting. Inspired by Jean Tardieu and Paul Morand, James Joyce but also Giacometti, Jean proposed to invite me in his appartement to see the painting from Matisse of his famous pianist and father Alfred Cortot. Guess what I responded?

 

Elegance

Elegance

“I started painting when I was young, and at ten years old I got the second prize from the hands of Giovani Gronchi, the President of the Italian Republic, for a drawing contest celebrating the Italian reunification. My Dad wanted me to continue to study but at the age of 20 I got the chance to do a two month theatre performance show all over Mexico, as part of a theatre festival. We were performing an Antonin Arthaud play, not simple, and I met through that experience Arturo Schwarz, a poet who convinced me to continue painting….and I did never stop since then.”

Marco Del Re lives between his two studios in Paris and Saint Paul de Vence, and he was kind enough to welcome me  in the intimacy of his very unique studio in the 14th district of Paris.. I was lucky to spend two full hours with Marco while he was painting that little art piece for his next series. I was amazed by this very elegant italian artist, as elegant to paint as if he was invited to the Presidency Palace…

 

 

Second chance

Second chance

“I cannot stand the idea of being denied freedom; not being allowed to go where you want and obliged to live in a very small space with others you do not know is something I do not bear. No one should be reduced to its errors only, humans are not only THE errors they did once, they have the right to continue to move along in building their lives with confidence and trust from others.”

When I asked Matthieu why he decided one day to be a volunteer in visiting prisoners, he added that having a Dad part of the French penitentiary  administration, had probably influenced him as well. Unlike the prisoners he visits for three hours each week, Matthieu considers himself as very lucky in life, and giving of his time to prisoners is a way for Mathieu de give back a bit of that luck.

” At the end of the day I believe that helping prisoners to leave their incarceration with more of humanity is a way for me to protect my family, my community and the society; these guys deserve to be listened by others than only policemen, lawyers or judges”.

I was amazed by the high generosity of Matthieu in a world where money and individualism is too often presented as the only way to happiness. I wish we were all “Matthieu’s.”